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AGENDA 2007/05/15AGENDA SPECIAL CITY COUNCIL MEETING INS TUESDAY, MAY 15, 2007, 5:00 P.M. �ALIFORNiA CITY COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM 245 E. BONITA AVENUE 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ORAL COMMUNICATIONS a. Members of the Audience 3. , PLANNING COMMISSION INTERVIEWS 5:00 p.m. Arthur Randy Alva 5:25 p.m. George Forslund 5:50 p.m. Kathleen Mulligan 6:15 p.m. Laura Nash 6:40 p.m. Bob Miars 4. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting is May 22, 2007, 7:00 p.m. CITY of ©� Agenda Item Staff Report eLIFORNtn�� TO: Honorable Mayor and Members of City Council For the Meeting of August 14, 2007 FROM: Blaine Michaelis, City Manager INITIATED BY: Community Development SUBJECT: Consideration of an Open Space Preservation Policy to provide guidelines, standards and priorities for future preservation and acquisition of open space. SUMMARY Staff has been working on the Open Space Preservation Policy over the last year or so and has recently completed the updates contemplated from the discussions held at the Spring 2007 Retreat. The attached policy is intended to position the City for seeking grants and submitting proposals related to open space acquisition. It sets forth standards and priorities for these potential funding opportunities. BACKGROUND This matter was previously considered at the Spring 2007 Retreat at which time Staff was directed to complete Tier I Analysis (incorporating any Council comments in criteria and weighting) and prepare Open Spade Preservation Program in resolution form for adoption by City Council. Furthermore, as part of the planned General Plan update, Staff would initiate amendment to Open Space and Conservation Elements of San Dimas General Plan. Staff had previously conducted an analysis on the current open space in the City of San Dimas and to come up with criteria on evaluating Open Space land acquisition. There was an analysis done in December 2005 that identified the city and joint use parks. The analysis indicated that there are approximately 191 acres of Community Parks and 93 acres of Neighborhood Parks. The National Recreation and Parks Association recommend, with regards to Neighborhood to Open Space Preservation Policy Page 2 August 14, 2007 Parks, that cities have one to two acres per 1000 people. They also recommend that with Community Parks, cities should calculate five to eight acres per 1000 people. National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) recommends: Neighborhood Park: 1 to 2 acres per 1000 people Community Park: 5 to 8 acres per 1000 people the Standard set by the NRPA: (the City of San Dimas should be at): Neighborhood Park: 36 - 72 acres Park: 180 - 288 acres The standard Plan is: General Neighborhood Park: 2 acres per 1000 people Community Park: 3.5 acres per 1000 people San. Dimas Population: 35,850 Currently San Dimas is inventoried at. - Neighborhood Park: 93.513 acres Community Park: 191.183 acres Within the City limits are two County regional parks, Bonelli Park (1650 acres) and San Dimas Canyon Park (130 acres). As land is increasingly less available, it is important to develop an open space criteria and utilize it as a tool to manage growth and protect important land and water resources. By prioritizing which land areas are important, we can focus on funding for acquisition and partnerships. Some of the factors that were considered in the creation of an open space preservation policy are: recognizing land areas that are threatened by development; areas that need to be protected due to environmental issues; flooding potential; access to trails; and recreational attributes. The challenge when evaluating future investments is to strike a balance between what improves a community, what residents can afford and what is fair. ANALYSIS Purpose of Open Space Selection Criteria The City wishes to establish open space selection criteria for the orderly acquisition of open space. The criteria should conform with the City's Plan of Conservation and Development, and other State, Federal, and Private agencies Open Space Preservation Policy August 14, 2007 Page 3 with an interest in, or are responsible for the Open Space and Watershed Land Acquisition Programs. Existing State Criteria The City should conform its open space acquisition criteria to existing state criteria in order to avoid conflict with existing statutes and regulations and to enhance the approvability of potential applications for state grants available for the acquisition of open space. The State has established the following criteria for open space: 1. protects land identified as being especially valuable for recreation, forestry, fishing, conservation of wildlife or natural resources; protects land which includes or contributes to a prime natural feature of the landscape 3. protects habitat for native plant or animal species listed as threatened or endangered or of special concern; 4. protects a relatively undisturbed outstanding example of a native ecological community that is now uncommon; 5. enhances and conserves water quality 6. preserves local agricultural heritage The State defines a greenway as open space corridor that: Open Space Preservation Policy August 14, 2007 Page 4 may protect natural resources, presence scenic landscapes and historical resources or offer opportunities for recreation or nonmotorized transportation 2. may connect existing protected areas and provide access to the outdoors 3. may be located along a defining natural feature, such as a waterway, along a man-made corridor, including an unused right-of-way, traditional trail routes or historic barge canals 4. may be a greenspace along a highway or around a village. Proposed Criteria for the City of San Dimas Open space serves various functions and values. In light of San Dimas's current state of advanced development and historical context, the City must discern which of these functions have the greatest merit. These functions and values cover a broad range, from providing land for public recreational activities, to less tangible functions such as enhancing appreciation of the natural world. The City may wish to conduct an open space site walk of certain parcels to determine their environmental functions and values. Guidelines and Standards Although there is virtually total agreement as to the need for open space, there is by no means agreement as to specific need standards. However, it is apparent that standards for the designation of open space should primarily consider the extent to which the uses of open space, alluded to in the open space element, can be identified and accommodated. In addition such standards should also consider the following variables: the extent, character, intensity, and pace of urbanization; the magnitude and distribution of the urban population; its rate of growth, mobility, and social and economic characteristics; the degree of stress and tension of urban living; and the availability of financial resources for open space acquisition. Establishing Priorities In establishing relative importance, the greater the number of uses or functions, the higher the system's priority should be. For example, a system which provides the opportunity to conserve natural vegetation and wildlife while also preserving agricultural lands or groundwater resources should receive a higher priority than a system which provides the opportunity for only a single use. Development Threat Lack of Parks in Neighborhoods - Areas deficient in General Plan population based park standards would receive a higher consideration for retention than areas meeting those standards. These areas can become a priority within the city to provide this service to that particular area instead of a new development. Open Space Preservation Policy August 14, 2007 Page 5 Visual Access/Scenic Criteria Scenic criteria consider whether the area: 1. is primarily in its natural state, and its preservation would maintain or enhance the conservation of natural or scenic resources; 2. has outstanding scenic and visual qualities; 3. has quality long vistas either to or from the open space, and 4. provides for scenic and visual enjoyment or relief from continuous urban development. Access and Recreation Potential 1. Access - is evaluated against both the number and quality of potential public access points into an open space area. Considerations include: 2. Recreational Potential - also recognizes areas particularly suited to recreational activities, such as those containing streams and trails. The most consideration is given to areas that offer multiple recreational uses such as pedestrian, bicycle and equestrian trails, open play areas, picnicking, etc. Ecology/Environmental Considerations 1. Fauna and Flora Features - Areas where endangered animals and vegetation are located, and highly vegetated areas, such as those with many or varied trees and flora. 2. Geological Features Geological open space capitalizes on our City's geological features - mountain ranges, drainage systems, river valleys, and coastal plains. It also includes safety considerations, such as earthquake fault zones and other geological hazards such as steep areas of unstable soil. RECOMMENDATION Adopt Resolution No. 07-53 establishing an Open Space Preservation Policy for the City of San Dimas. Respectfully Submitted, 4.,,9 Larry Stevens, Assistant City Manager for Community Development Attachments: 1. Resolution No. 07-53 2. Tier I Analysis Chart RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN DIMAS ADOPTING AN OPEN SPACE PRESERVATION POLICY WHEREAS, City Council has determined that it is necessary to implement a formal citywide program to protect and preserve open space within the city. WHEREAS, the City wishes to establish formal procedures for the identification, evaluation, selection, and acquisition of potential open space land in the City; and WHEREAS, the City's eligibility to receive preservation grants could be enhanced by the adoption of an Open Space Preservation Policy. NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council now finds as follows: A. The purpose of the policy set forth is: 1) To preserve the open space qualities of the City. 2) To protect sensitive environmental areas and areas which serve important ecological functions in the City. 3) To provide land to meet existing and future recreational needs of city residents, for both active and passive recreational activities. 4) To develop and implement methods and means for protecting open space lands in the City by utilizing a prioritization and scoring criteria. B. The Open Space Preservation Policy provides procedures and guidelines in selecting the open space parcels to be protected. PURSUANT TO THE ABOVE FINDINGS, IT IS RESOLVED that the City Council approves the San Dimas Open Space Preservation Policy as set forth in Attachment A. PASSED, APPROVED and ADOPTED, the 14th day of August, 2007 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 2 ATTEST: Ina Rios, CMC, City Clerk Curtis W. Morris, Mayor of the City of San Dimas RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 3 ATTACHMENT A OPEN SPACE PRESERVATION POLICY OPEN SPACE PROGRAM POLICY STATEMENT: The City of San Dimas Open Space Preservation program seeks to promote quality of life for the citizens of San Dimas by preserving and protecting the natural environment that has given this City much of its character. Its natural areas included beautiful terrain and native flora and fauna. Open Space will create harmony between physical development and the natural environment for the benefit of all San Dimas citizens. It will foster appreciation of the natural environment by providing increased opportunities for both passive and active recreation. Preservation of open space reinforces pride in our past and contributes to a vision for our future. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF LAND PRESERVATION: Lands acquired for open space shall be preserved and managed in a manner consistent with low impact public use. Such lands can include scenic vistas, floodplains, trail corridors, historically recognized wildlife corridors, farmlands, highly visible natural areas along arterial streets, and open space buffers at the City's perimeter. Open spaces generally will be open for passive public use and enjoyment, and trails will be developed where possible to provide access. Examples of compatible passive recreation include hiking, nature study, picnicking, environmental education and photography. Development within the preserved open space will be limited to features that enhance and encourage ecotourism. Such features may include roads, trails, trailheads and picnic areas. Comfort facilities and a limited number of parking spaces will accompany trailheads and picnic areas.. Certain open space properties may be leased by the City to individuals or groups for cultural uses or continued agricultural uses such as farming or grazing. This approach can provide a glimpse of San Dimas' past, protect the land from development, and continue compatible land use practices while shifting some maintenance costs to the lessee. Generally, the leased properties will continue to afford limited public access for passive enjoyment. In certain cases, it may be necessary to purchase a total property in order to preserve a portion of the property as open space. In such cases, the City may opt to dispose of the remainder, and the open space acquisition account shall be reimbursed the value of the disposed land at the time of its sale. PROPOSED CRITERIA: Not all properties are available for purchase at the same time. Thus, the opportunity for a specific acquisition could be lost. Priority RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 4 must be given to specific properties that meet the criteria when they become, or are about to become, available for purchase. It is recognized that this criteria may be subject to differing interpretations depending on the nature and circumstances of various opportunities for the acquisition of open space. Any particular criterion may receive more or less weight depending on a variety of factors. The following important open space functions and other strategic aspects should be considered in identifying high priority lands for acquisition. The six criteria below are set forth in order of their intrinsic significance relative to each other. ESTABLISHING GUIDELINES, STANDARDS, AND PRIORITIES: In establishing relative importance, the greater the number of uses or functions, the higher the system's priority should be. There are six priorities that establish relative importance with regards to the criteria, and these are listed below. CRITERIA: Six major criteria shall guide the selection of specific open space sites for possible acquisition and preservation: 1. PROTECTION AND PRESERVATION: Protection of environmentally sensitive features (e.g. wetlands, native vegetation, wildlife, floodplain encroachment, agriculture and visual corridors). ACCESS AND LINKAGES: Ability of the land to be used for passive recreational purposes including trail linkages, access to public lakes, streams and other usable open space lands. Location of property within a proximity or contiguity to other open space enhances the value of otherwise lower functioning open space by providing access to other open space, public access areas or easements. 3. AESTHETICS AND CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES: Unique or dramatic visual impact; protects scenic view corridors; natural features that enhance quality of life (e.g. forest lands, range lands, agricultural lands, aquifer recharge areas, and surface water). 4. LOCATION: Enhances spatial definition of urban area; protects remaining undeveloped land within large developed area of City; expands the distribution of open space across the City; provides key link or extension/addition to existing park/open space area; provides added open space in proximity to existing proposed urban development; improves overall access to open space. RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 5 5. NEED FOR IMMEDIATION ACTION: Development pressure; development status; potential to remain as open space; attitude of property owner. 6. ACQUISITION CONSIDERATION: Availability of land; price of land; significance of economic loss to City; potential for increase in price in the near future; potential for acquiring other sources of funds. EVALUATING TIERS: in addition to these criteria, the Open Space Preservation Program identifies three Tiers in evaluating potential open space acquisitions. TIER I: In Tier I, the data set will then be assembled into the following categories or themes: • Ecology and Wildlife • Development Threat • Visual Access • Linkage/Access • Surface Water • Low Impact Recreation Ecology and Wildlife — Information and survey data detailing ecology and wildlife studies will be utilized to rank the parcel on a scale of 50 to 150 points. Values of 50 (Low); 100 (Medium) and 150 (High) will be assigned to the parcels that have the potential to include habitats and wildlife. All other parcels areas without evidence of endangered or threatened ecology/wildlife will be scored as zero. Development Threat — Data will be compiled to identify parcels that are facing the most immediate threat and greatest vulnerability from anticipated urbanization. Most undeveloped and underdeveloped parcels within the City are facing tremendous residential and non-residential development pressure, due to increasing land values coupled with proximity to infrastructure, accessible schools, and support services and facilities. A score will be assigned of 150 points for land proximity to services, infrastructure, accessibility, and facilities. All other parcel areas will be given a score of zero. Visual Access —We consider all lands within a reasonable distance of a public trail or roadway to be potentially visible to the public, and therefore potentially of benefit as open space, subject to further analysis of the visual quality of any RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 6 particular parcel. We assigned a score of 150 to any lands within a distance of 1000 feet from trails and select roads. All other parcel areas were given a score of zero. Linkage /Access — We review all known existing and proposed trails in the study area and note any missing links between trails, and between trails and parks, open space, or other recreational destinations. We then assign a score of 150 to the corridor 0.25 mile (1320') wide along these missing links, on the assumption that a trail somewhere within that corridor would satisfy the need for a trail connection. All other parcel areas were given a score of zero. Surface Water— In order to represent the Open Space Criteria calling for the conservation of surface water, the edges of water bodies and stream corridors were scored a value of 150 points. This included all lands within a selected variable distance of 0.125 (660') to 0.25 (1320') mile of lakes and streams. All other parcel areas were given a score of zero. Low -Impact Recreation — Attributes within the data that would indicate some potential for recreational uses were scored. Parcels with topographic interest, or proximity to water, or with potentially good vistas were assigned a positive value. Parcels within 0.25 mile of existing or proposed trails will be assigned positive value for recreation on the basis of access. Parcel size will also be factored in, on the assumption that larger parcels will accommodate recreation activities with less impact than smaller ones. At the same time, in order to represent the Open Space Criteria for the preservation of wildlife habitat often present near water, parcels will be devalued if they are within 0.25 mile of major streams or reservoirs, or 0.125 mile of smaller waterways, to protect the habitat from low - impact recreation. We assign a factor of 50 points (Low), 100 points (Medium), 150 points (High), and all other parcels not meeting this category, a zero. Tier Y: Individual tracts of land that are under consideration for inclusion in the open space system should be evaluated to determine how well they address the specific criteria and overall goals of the City's open space element. This includes lands that are identified in Tier I, and any lands offered through a willing seller or other means. It should be noted that it is the intent of the City of San Dimas to only pursue the acquisition of land with willing sellers. At this level we begin to look at individual parcels with a finer filter. Evaluation tools should be used to further evaluate individual parcels to determine the degree of each value present through additional field study and evaluate for other criterion including: • Willingness of seller • Wildlife /vegetation and restoration potential RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 7 • Recreation value and adjacent land uses • Cost/benefit of acquisition and long-term management • Cultural and historic value This evaluation will allow staff to determine acquisition priorities by means of comparison. To evaluate individual tracts, the open space staff can utilize the evaluation forms provided as part of this study. This will help the City make decisions on whether or not a given parcel of land is worth the cost of acquiring and maintaining it. Taken as a whole, the evaluations also can become part of a database that will tell the City how well its open space lands are meeting the objectives of the ordinance. Also, the evaluations can be used to determine how specific parcels should be maintained. If a parcel scores high as agricultural land, it should be maintained differently from one that scores high for wildlife habitat. Tier M: Once a parcel has been evaluated and selected through Tiers I and 11, it is time to pose the questions: • Who should acquire the land? • Is it a partnering opportunity? • Should it be acquired fee simple or protected through some other means? Each parcel should be evaluated to determine how well it meets the goals and objectives of other planning efforts of the City and of LA County. Parcels should be referred to other City agencies to determine need for water, transportation or other uses. METHODS OF ACQUISITION: The method of Open Space acquisition by the City of San Dimas shall be by one of the following: • Simple fee acquisition: Outright ownership of the land • Conservation easements: A legal agreement by the property owner to restrict the type of amount.of development. • Short or long-term leases: Renting th eland for a period of time. • Regulations such as developer dedications or impact fees to offset park and open space infrastructure costs that result from development. DONATIONS TO OPEN SPACE PROGRAM: The City of San Dimas encourages concered persons or parties to donate certain lands or monies for use in the Open Space Program. City Council may by ordinance accept properties not acquired with Open Space Funds into the Open Space Program. Donated properties outside the established Open Space criteria may be sold by RESOLUTION NO. 07-53 Page 8 the City with proceeds to be used for Open Space maintenance and improvements. RESTRICTIONS ON OPEN SPACE PROPERTY: It may be necessary to temporarily close an open space property in order to protect a natural resource, or to make the property safe for public enjoyment. Fencing and/or signage may be installed to delineate and protect certain properties. MAINTENANCE OF OPEN SPACE PROPERTIES: The Parks and Recreation Department shall be responsible for the regular maintenance and operation of the Open Space properties, subject to funds made available in the general operating budget and from the Open Space maintenance and improvements account. Page 1 8/9/2007 TIER I: Property E `Rank Attributes w Tope. leterest, : pro:ismiy to water good ulster, F distaneetotr 2 In off -. �> a Lead �' i 15 dev alaed- if wAn mile of major p - (� < .r s - "a a m ,, ;. ,.,,� ,. ,. � a ­Rank distance W Water edges, � ' b streemslreserwin to p%tees x ,Rank+ s, j„ - ,v W. �"' - , c � �' Rank Posdble Trail Liulo<ge wdnr- . stream rorridori (:124(660� to 25 1 _) Rank Pouible Utdiration �, Rank Who l0001t. from TraW- SS ndle.(1320�ofE:lstlug TraO=: ' (t330�ofiskesandstresmt w ) -100 (Medium) =.. .:-0 0 (N) , .:-b, j .-0 (No) > -1 ", 0 o .. ,.: (N ),. �' ZX 0(No),-' (l.ow) .: - loo (Medium) 150 < 150 a ' ; s :150 es d -150 y , O <THE_III L L 8678-029-017 V r (4 995jacres) i 100 0 0 150 (adj. to SD Canyon Golf) 150 (Ham Canyon) 50 (adj. to SD Canyon Golf) CHU;'SHAN &`°FAN 2> 8678,029 018 :; (67 6864'acres)={ 100 0 0 150 150 50 CHU. SHAN &sFAN 3'z 8665 001 (284104 aixe) 130 sx era s130r } p5 +' :150 (Shale Ganytm� ti 150` $hult7`Csny�)" 150 ` ` ' 15U < 7. I ARK:AL°LENNN AT w ..... 'II4 8665=003 001W(62495 acrev) 150 130 1=50`(ShulaCenyon) ' ;" 150(ShultxCtmyoa 150 *50 �,LARKtiALL 'ESTATTJ 5' 8665'001 006 (6.28 aeresV 9 0 150 0 0 50 �>h- LAtJRETTA�1tUDOLPH� . _ ` ° 8665=002 015 '�- (5.6045 acres) 's; ? 0 150 150 (Ham canyon) 150 100 (adj. to SD Canyon Golf) M. DAYE t-BAYLESS ; 7 8665 001'002 ' (10 3846`ataes) 150 150 150 (Wildwood /Shuler 0 0 100 (adj. to Shuler Canyon) NJD s Canyons) ;8i 8665 001 003'�W" (302628 acres)' ' 150 0 150 (Wildwood /Shuler 150 (Shuler Canyon) 0 100 (adj. to Shuler Canyon) Canyons) 8678°030 033 (153.39 & 6 I I'' acres} 150 0 150 (Wildwood / 150 (Sycamore Canyon) 0 50 (adj. to Sycamore / >9 `5. Sycamore Canyons) Wildwood Canyon) 10 866V001`004 (381583 acres) 150 0 150 (Shuler Canyon) 150 (Sycamore Canyon) 150 100 f _ MCHENRY F DAVID��` , i 11 8665-,OOl 005 = (371799aa) 150 0 0 150 0 100 ILI MCHENRYF DAVIA x };: .: .12 8678=030 005n(z169s eit3 ai oe) *- 150 150 150 (Sycamore Canyon) 150 (Shay Canyon) 150 (Sycamore Canyon) 150 (adj. to Shay Canyon) g yn '­AaDEFAJ O ••> P Page 2 8/9/2007 r Property {= i Eco o . d ife Development 1 a isual Access Linkage/ ec Surface ater w mac R c e tion v at `: ` f - i +fit - a Rank Attributes as Topo IntereK to water good vista, �., �' # a i ,_ > „I x + �., o, .. �+.5 C• pronm(ty distaneetotrWs(15)bmisof y,.,.. , �-.� t. r-' -t ; :- r' a¢... - r - a�' aeeess; Land r `••jw." m s v P✓. siu of ar ' rap. ,z ` F .-xY' 'x.+..+55t .,? .yf §,:,i'tjn,a}'z dev Wued`:U wfln lS mLe of major •- ,• 1 —+.: " '� £ ., v >. c Rto distance water eams/raer top_ roteel . ;. -.•E Rik ''Poss�blnTraa linkage wAn,--meam comdors (124(660 15 �wirs "' "Low=High ' RaokPosrible Utitiz_anon '.Rank w/in IOOOft.�from Trsas".' 15 mile.(1320) of F.iishng TrW(1 F 320') flakes aitl itreams:-" Low -ER gh ;v _, r'.. .� .`,_, - -50(Luw)-100(Medium)�- 0(No) .0(No) T "` 0(No) z ;>-�O(No).Y ' 50 ([.ow)"' 100(Medium) 150 150«150 s es) ..' __, a �..., •150. a t ... .: £ fig,., a 150 es)., - A A. z...-.. 150 es. 1'3.8678-030-00. I-Q7, 7916• � 100 0 150 (Ham Canyon) 150 (Sycamore Canyon Mtwy.)m 150 (Ham Canyon) 100 (Ham Canyon) rt• •HUNG SHUI •SHENG a ; -t 44- aE 1� 8678;030-029i�� ,�(79E244�acres) 100 0 150 (Ham Canyon) 150 (Sycamore Canyon Mtwy.) 150 (Ham Canyon) 100 (Ham Canyon) 11TANGCOIMW* ;I5 8678=029 O15 s (4029 scree) 100 0 0 0 0 50 (North of SD Canyon Golf Course) O�F�id/GLIADSTO ta`6-83861023 043"' t (.9079 a` ) ? 150 (adj. to approved 150 (adj. to approved horse 0 50 TSB CH[U horse trail and bikepath) trail and bike path) ;a1778386"02-3L'039 ` • ;(�4145 Ries) � ? ? 150 (adj. to approved 150 (adj. to approved horse 0 50 TSAIVCH[U horse trail and bikepath) trail and bike path) 18g8382002�035 (1.4114 atxes) 3 ? ? 150 (adj. to bike lane) 150 (adj. to bike lane) 0 50 (Puddingstone/Walnut MAdESTICHIyfAPA=PROP.. Creek) "h9 8382f002a03$ I (81 acres ? ? 150 (adj. to bike lane) 150 (adj. to bike lane) 0 50 (Puddingstone(Walnut EH�TE,ZEN , t Creek) =20 838'600,E 1 7-A252.ACRFS) g ? ? 150 (.25 of horse trail) 150 (.25 of horse trail) 0 50 THORTONr7AIvIES. vu�ALlDWO M : __ 9i 8385=016=007 j8533T�29�acres 150 0 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Walnut Creek) 150 (Walnut Creek) =BUDDHIST CON VASSIONvRE .F 4�22 8385 016 006 57.91, as es) 150 150 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Walnut Creek) 150 (Walnut Creek) VISTAVERDE,(DENTE ,3. 8426 1 O (2:f208 ).. -426. 150 0 150 (Antonovich Trail) ISO (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Walnut Creek) 150 (Walnut Creek) BUD COMPASSION REti TZU r248426021"OI7 (t5:7469aaes}"a' 150 0 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Walnut Creek) 150 (Walnut Creek) ANDREW JCREVOLIN 2StM8426-021 019`(S o26aaas) 150 0 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Antonovich Trail) 150 (Walnut Creek) 150 (Walnut Creek) , ;�ANDIiEw 1. clii�voLna �,� M